Common Injuries

OSSM Orthopedics

ACL Tears

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four major knee ligaments. The ACL is critical at helping to prevent instability episodes of the knee. Treatment of an ACL tear often requires surgery followed by months of rehabilitation. Athletes, especially female athletes, should take important steps to help prevent this serious sports injury.

 

Back Strains

Lumbar strains occur to just about everyone at some point in their life. Avoiding these injuries will help you prevent the pain and disability associated with this problem. One step you can take to help prevent lumbar strains is to learn proper lifting techniques. By lifting properly, you will use the correct muscles and avoid placing your back in potentially strenuous positions.

 

Hip Fractures

Hip fractures are a possible complication of osteoporosis, a condition that causes thinning of the bone. Hip fractures are severe injuries that can lead to many problems. Preventing a hip fracture is the most important step you can take. Patients over age 65 and anyone with significant osteoporosis in particular should take these important steps to prevent a hip fracture.

 

Wear & Tear Arthritis

The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis, also known as wear-and-tear arthritis. Osteoarthritis does not have one cause, rather it is thought to be caused by several contributing factors. Some of these factors we have no control over, such as genetics and age. But we do have control over several other factors, including weight, activities, and treatments. Patients with early osteoarthritis can take steps to prevent progression of the arthritis.

 

Bunions

Bunions cause a painful bump on the inner side of the big toe. While we know that some bunions are unavoidable, the vast majority of bunions that require treatment can be attributed to footwear problems. Even once bunions have developed, steps can be taken to prevent progression of the condition.

 

Ankle Sprain

What Are Ankle Sprains?

The ankle is one of the most common places in the body for a sprain. Landing wrong on your foot can cause the ankle to roll to the side. This can stretch or tear ligaments. Ankle sprains can occur at any time, such as when you step off a curb or play sports. Once you’ve had an ankle sprain, you may be more likely to sprain that ankle again.

When Ligaments Tear

Your ankle joint is where the bones in your leg and foot meet. Strong bands of tissue called ligaments connect these bones. Muscles run from the lower leg across the ankle into the foot. The ligaments and muscles help keep the ankle joint stable when you move. If you twist or turn your ankle, the ligaments can stretch or tear. This is called a sprain. A sprain can be mild, moderate, or severe. This depends on how badly the ligaments are damaged.

 

Plantar Fasciitis

The plantar fascia is a ligament-like band running from your heel to the ball of your foot. This band pulls on the heel bone, raising the arch of your foot as it pushes off the ground. But if your foot moves incorrectly, the plantar fascia may become strained. The fascia may swell and its tiny fibers may begin to fray, causing plantar fasciitis.

Causes

Plantar fasciitis is often caused by poor foot mechanics. If your foot flattens too much, the fascia may overstretch and swell. If your foot flattens too little, the fascia may ache from being pulled too tight.

Symptoms

With plantar fasciitis, the bottom of your foot may hurt when you stand, especially first thing in the morning. Pain usually occurs on the inside of the foot, near the spot where your heel and arch meet. Pain may lessen after a few steps, but it comes back after rest or with prolonged movement. Related Problems

A heel spur is extra bone that may grow near the spot where the plantar fascia attaches to the heel. The heel spur may form in response to the plantar fascia’s tug on the heel bone.

Bursitis is the swelling of a bursa, a fluid-filled sac that reduces friction between a ligament and a bone. Bursitis may develop if a swollen plantar fascia presses against a plantar bursa.

 

Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a problem that affects the wrist and hand. If you have CTS, tingling and numbness can make even simple tasks hard to do. But CTS can be treated, and your symptoms can be controlled.

Learning about Carpal Tunnel

The carpal tunnel is a narrow space inside the wrist that is surrounded by bone and ligament. This space lets certain tendons and a major nerve pass from the forearm into the hand. With CTS, the tendon sheaths may thicken and enlarge. This reduces the amount of space inside the carpal tunnel. As a result, the median nerve may be compressed. The Symptoms of CTS

Tingling and numbness are the most common symptoms of CTS. Some people also have hand pain or even a weakened grip. At first, symptoms may wake you up at night. Later, they may also occur during your daily routines. For instance, you may notice symptoms while you are driving or holding a newspaper. Your symptoms may become more severe over time.

Working with Your Doctor

Your doctor will perform an exam to learn more about your symptoms. Once your problem is diagnosed, you and your doctor can make a treatment plan. He or she can help you learn about symptom relief and surgery. If you have surgery, you are likely to go home the same day.

 

Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is a painful condition that occurs when tendons in your elbow are overworked, usually by repetitive motions of the wrist and arm. Tennis elbow can result from poor technique in executing a tennis backhand. However, many occupations also feature repetitive wrist and arm motions that can cause tennis elbow.

The pain of tennis elbow occurs primarily where the tendons of your forearm muscles attach to the bony prominence on the outside of your elbow. Pain can also spread into your forearm and wrist.

Rest and over-the-counter pain relievers often help relieve tennis elbow. If conservative treatments don’t help or if symptoms are disabling, your doctor may suggest surgery.

 

Meniscus Tear

Your knee is the largest joint in your body and one of the most complex. Because you use it so much, it is vulnerable to injury. Because it is made up of so many parts, many different things can go wrong.

Meniscal tears are among the most common knee injuries. Athletes, particularly those who play contact sports, are at risk for meniscal tears. However, anyone at any age can tear a meniscus. When people talk about torn cartilage in the knee, they are usually referring to a torn meniscus.